res·to·ra·tion (noun)

a restoring to an unimpaired or improved condition

No matter where you go, human populations have always found ways to alter the landscape in an attempt to improve their environment.  Unfortunately, in our quest to make things more productive, our actions have sometimes destroyed or restricted the ecological function of the land.  When this happens, entire processes can be crippled and things never work quite right again.  However, despite continued abuse, many natural plant communities have an inherent resiliency that can recover rapidly with a little help.

 

Throughout the Mid-Atlantic region, there are countless different kinds of natural forests and grasslands.  From the top of the highest summits down to the coastal marshes, the southeastern landscapes are blessed by biodiversity.  Each area has a suite of species that is unique in various ways.  Regardless of what currently exists on a piece of land, there is also a history of past disturbances which dictates what is present.

Please take a moment to browse a few of our favorite plant communities or species.  If you are a landowner or manager and would like to discuss the options for an ecological restoration project, please contact us.

Shortleaf Pine

Pinus echinata

Shortleaf pine has the largest natural range of all southern yellow pine species.  It is the native dominant pine species throughout much of the piedmont, growing well on a range of sites from the coastal plain to the lower slopes of the Appalachians.

Related Communities:

Pine-Oak Savanna, Pine-Oak Hickory Forest

Piedmont Prairie

Diverse native grassland

One our most imperiled group of ecosystems are native grasslands.  These open habitats are highly prone to loss from development, forestation, and agricultural conversion.

Related Communities:

Pine-Oak Savanna, Mountain Bald,

Mafic Glade, Diabase Glade, Riparian Meadow

Oak-Hickory Woodland

Quercus stellata

These forest types offer a relatively easy restoration as there are still many places with the necessary overstory components needed for success.

Related Communities:

Pine-Oak Savanna, Dry-Mesic Oak-Hickory Forest, Chesnut Oak Forest